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Featured Article

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Red Tides - Red tide is a phenomenon when phytoplankton, a single-celled plant, grow very fast or “bloom” and accumulate into dense, visible patches near the water surface. Red tides are naturally occurring, but nutrient pollution and warming waters can fuel blooms, making them last longer and cover larger areas. Unfortunately, some phytoplankton are extremely harmful and toxic to humans and marine wildlife when they reach high concentrations. For instance, the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (K. brevis), that makes up red tides off the coast of Florida, can release harmful brevetoxins into the ocean and air, causing massive kills of fish, marine mammals, and sea turtles; and painful burning of the eyes and lungs for beach goers.

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Today's Coastal Factoid

Health impacts of oil spills: from hydrocarbons to oil dispersants

"'One of the biggest concerns in cleanup efforts is the effect the spill has on people’s health and livelihood,” Hazen said. “It’s not just that oil itself is harmful and potentially even flammable, but you have to be careful what kind of chemicals you expose crews to while trying to clean or contain the oil.' Key findings in the report include a look at the risks associated with one of the leading dispersal agents and questions and recommendations related to testing methodology." - Excerpt from The University of Tennessee, learn more about findings in the new report by the National Academy of Sciences.
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State of the Beach

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The Surfrider Foundation State of the Beach report is our continually-updated assessment of the health of our nation’s beaches. It is intended to empower concerned citizens and coastal managers by giving them the information needed to take action. For over ten years we have been collecting information on beach access, surf zone water quality, beach erosion, beach fill, shoreline structures, beach ecology and surfing areas to get an understanding of the condition of our nation’s beaches and the effectiveness of programs and policies designed to protect them.

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Why Beachapedia?

Beachapedia captures decades of experience and knowledge gained by Surfrider Foundation activists, scientists and staff through hundreds of environmental and educational campaigns on our coasts. By sharing this resource with the public we hope to provide tools and information to help communities make a positive impact on their local beaches. If you would like to contribute please visit this page.

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